Understanding long-term care insurance

11/17/17

By Brad Breeding

If you or a loved one own long-term care insurance (LTCI) it is important to understand how the policy works and what it covers so you will be better equipped to incorporate it into your overall retirement plan. Here is a description of the key components of LTCI:

Type(s) of Care Covered

If you own long-term care insurance (LTCI) or are thinking about purchasing coverage it is important to understand how the policy works and what it covers. Adult children should also be familiar with the details of their parents’ coverage because they will likely be involved with coordinating LTCI benefits when the time comes. By understanding the details of the policy you will be better equipped to get the most out of your coverage when it is needed.

What type of care is covered?

The earliest forms of LTCI (issued more than two decades ago) were considered “nursing home” policies, which covered skilled nursing services received in a nursing facility. Long-term care delivered at home or in an assisted living facility were not covered expenses.

Eventually policies began covering care in assisted living facilities and sometimes at-home care, but often at a discounted amount. For example, the policy might cover care in an assisted living facility at 50 percent of the benefit amount that would be paid for care received in a skilled nursing facility.

Most policies issued within the last five to 10 years are more comprehensive, providing the same amount of coverage regardless of where care is received. These policies may also cover expenses like adult day care and respite care.

LTCI Benefit Amount

The benefit amount is usually a daily or monthly amount, and the total lifetime benefit amount is expressed in years. For example, a policy might provide a daily benefit of $200 for three years. This amounts to a total lifetime benefit of $219,000 ($200 x 365 x 3). This does not mean that the policy must be used within three years, but rather that the policyholder has the equivalent of three years of coverage over their lifetime. However, a policy will not pay more than the stated benefit amount in any given day or month. Therefore, using the example above, the policy would not, for instance, pay out $300 for any one day of coverage.

Inflation Rider

Many policies include an “inflation rider” which increases the benefit amount annually to help ensure that the coverage amount reflects the increased cost of care over time. The formula used to determine the increase can vary from one policy to another. If your policy includes an inflation rider, you should know the current coverage amount, as opposed to the originally stated coverage amount. If this information is not clear, contact the insurance company and ask about the current benefit.

Coverage Elimination Period

Most LTCI policies have an elimination period. This is similar to a deductible, but is measured in days, not dollars. A policyholder chooses the elimination period (from zero to 180+ days) at the time of application. A longer elimination period lowers the premium, and vice versa. A policy’s elimination period can be based on days of care or calendar days. For example, a policy with a 90-day elimination period would specify if that means 90 calendar days (beginning with the first day of care), or 90 days of care. In some cases there could be a substantial difference in time between the two if there is a break in care within the 90-day period. Additionally, a policy could have different elimination periods for different care settings.

If you are thinking about buying coverage and want to keep your premiums lower, or if you want to lower premiums on your existing coverage, consider extending the elimination period. You may decide that you are willing, and able, to pay out of pocket for a certain amount of time but want to cap your exposure for all care beyond that.

Benefit Triggers

Before LTCI coverage will pay benefits, the policyholder must be unable to perform at least two of the six activities of daily living (ADLs): feeding, toileting, dressing, bathing, walking/transferring (i.e., moving from bed to wheelchair), and continence. Some policies may require that the policyholder be unable to perform three ADLs instead of two. Policies may also specify what is required before the policyholder is declared “unable” to perform a certain ADL. Additionally, some policies may include cognitive impairments, such as dementia or Alzheimer’s, as a benefit trigger. In some cases, a policy will not pay benefits unless a doctor certifies that the care is medically necessary.

Benefit Payment Methods

LTCI policies are generally categorized as either expense-incurred (reimbursement) or indemnity (set dollar amount). Under an expense-incurred policy, a policyholder only receives benefits when care is received. The policyholder, or a representative for the policyholder, must submit receipts for services. If it is an approved service, the insurance company will pay the insured or the care provider for the cost of services up to the daily (or monthly) benefit amount.

The less common indemnity plan pays the daily or monthly benefit amount stated in the policy, regardless of the actual cost of services. Once the claim is approved the benefit is paid directly to the policyholder, up to the stated benefit amount, and continues as long as eligible services are being received. The premium for an indemnity policy is typically higher than it would be for comparable coverage under an expense-incurred policy.

Hybrid Policies

An increasingly popular type of long-term care plan is actually a hybrid that combines life insurance (or a deferred annuity) and long-term care insurance. If you meet the benefit triggers, which are typically similar to those described above, then you can tap into the long-term care benefit. If, however, you never require long-term care insurance then your heirs will receive the death benefit. Additionally, if you cancel the policy anytime in between you will receive the cash surrender value at that time.

The appeal of a hybrid policy is that the policyholder (or the heirs) is assured to receive cash back whether he or she uses the long-term care insurance or not. The trade-offs are that a traditional policy will buy more coverage per dollar and a hybrid policy requires premiums to be paid in a lump sum — usually $50,000 or more, or at least within 10 years. When premiums are spread out over 10 years the amount per year will be higher than for a traditional plan since traditional plans spread payments over lifetime.

Those who own a cash value life insurance and are interested in getting long-term care insurance may be able change their existing policy into a hybrid plan without having to pay any additional premiums. This can be particularly beneficial for those who, due to health issues, may not be able to qualify for traditional long-term care insurance because hybrid plans sometimes have more flexible underwriting guidelines. This is particularly true of annuity-based hybrid plans.

For a more detailed explanation of LTCI, request a Long-Term Care Insurance Buyers Guide from your state’s insurance department. To understand how long-term insurance can be applied to living at The Culpeper, contact Helen Burnett, Director of Marketing, at hburnett@theglebe.org or call 540-591-2100.

Brad Breeding is co-founder and president of myLifeSite, a website designed to provide objective information about continuing care retirement communities. A certified financial planner, Brad’s extensive knowledge of the senior living industry, combined with his financial planning background, allows him to provide valuable insights about lifestyle, healthcare, and financial planning considerations for seniors. This article is legally licensed for use.  

 

 


The tax advantages of a Life Care plan

There are many advantages of Life Care at The Glebe starting with the peace of mind it provides. Life Care allows residents to put a plan in place for future care and removes the risk of unexpected nursing home or assisted living costs. But the financial benefits do not stop there. Did you know that new residents of a Continuing Care Retirement Community may qualify for a tax deduction on their entry fee and monthly fees?

Brad Breeding, writing on the tax benefits of CCRCs for MyLifeSite.net, explains that seniors who itemize their taxes may be able to deduct a portion of the fees as medical expenses. Quoting a 2012 article by Paul Gordon of the California law firm Hansen Bridgett, Breeding writes, “Portions of entrance fees and monthly fees paid by independent living residents of a CCRC or other ‘lifetime care facility’ are deductible to the extent that they represent a charge or pre-payment for future assisted living or skilled nursing care.”

Please note that this information should not be construed as tax advice. Because additional court rulings may have impacted the availability of deductions, consult with your tax advisor to learn more. You may also contact one of our retirement counselors at The Glebe at 866-376-8990 for more information on contract types.


Winter safety tips for seniors

Winter can be a dangerous time, especially for seniors. Ice, snow, frigid temperatures and slippery surfaces are often responsible for a number of accidents and illnesses during the winter months. It’s especially important for seniors to take preventative steps to ensure their safety throughout the coldest months of the year.

Writing for care.com, Andrea Lee offers these tips to help keep you and your family safe during the winter months.

  1. Be careful on the ice

    Walking on ice is tricky and can lead to a fall. Often these falls cause major injuries such as hip and wrist fractures and head trauma. To avoid falling, wear shoes with good traction and non-skid soles, and stay inside until the roads are clear. Replace a worn cane tip to making walking easier. Take off your shoes as soon as you return indoors to avoid creating slippery conditions inside. One of the benefits of living at a Continuing Care Retirement Community like The Glebe is the presence of a caring, committed maintenance staff. They scrape and shovel the sidewalks so you don’t have to!

  2. Dress warmly

    Cold temperatures can lead to frostbite and hypothermia, a condition where the body temperature dips too low. According to a 2014 report published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , older people are more likely than younger people to succumb to cold temperatures. As a result, keep your thermostat on a reasonably warm temperature and dress in layers. If you must venture outdoors, wear warm socks, a heavy coat, a warm hat, gloves and a scarf.  In very cold temperatures, cover all exposed skin. Use a scarf to cover your mouth and protect your lungs. One final word of caution: Your body temperature should never dip below 95 degrees. If it does, seek medical assistance immediately.

  3. Fight wintertime depression

    Because winter can be a difficult and dangerous time to get around, many seniors lose contact with others during cold months. Feelings of loneliness and isolation can occur.  To avoid these issues, family members can check in on seniors as often as possible. Even a short, daily phone call can make a big difference. Seniors can also arrange a check-in system with neighbors and friends. At The Glebe, social connections are built-in, and you never have to worry about being isolated or alone. From bridge to yoga to water aerobics in our saltwater pool, you have many opportunities to enjoy life with friends and avoid the pitfalls of the winter blues.

One of our retirement counselors will be glad to talk with you about the safety and security that comes from living at The Glebe. Call us today at 866-376-8990 to learn more.


Enjoy the holidays at The Glebe

It’s the most wonderful time of the year at The Glebe, and we invite you to celebrate the joy of the season with us. Shake off the cold with a cup of hot chocolate and the warm, welcoming atmosphere for which our community is best known. Enjoy the festive ambiance of the holidays by attending our Christmas carol sing-along or one of our many holiday musical performances. There’s no better time of year to enjoy all The Glebe has to offer.

The Glebe Holiday Getaway is our invitation for you and your family to be our very special guests this holiday season. Experience first-hand the worry-free lifestyle you could call your own if you choose to make our community your home. Join us for a three-day Glebe getaway or customize a unique stay that works best for you. Plan your time with us around the abundance of holiday-related activities we offer. We’ll also share information about the area’s most popular holiday events, including the Hotel Roanoke Festival of Trees and The Roanoke Times “Dickens of a Christmas” in downtown Roanoke.

The Glebe Holiday Getaway includes:

  • Accommodations in our guest rooms
  • Full access to all of our on-campus amenities
  • Complimentary breakfasts, lunches and dinners throughout your stay
  • Convenient concierge services
  • A welcome basket filled with delicious snacks and delightful refreshments to greet you upon arrival
  • Maps and an itinerary personalized especially for you

In addition to all this, you’ll have an opportunity to sit down with one of our retirement counselors to learn more about retirement living and Life Care at The Glebe. Don’t miss your chance to take advantage of this incredible opportunity and, more importantly, to enjoy the holidays in the mountains!

Call 866-376-8990 to schedule your Glebe Holiday Getaway today!


LifeSpire announces new leadership at The Glebe

By Ann Lovell

RICHMOND, Virginia—LifeSpire of Virginia is pleased to announce the selection of Ellen D’Ardenne as executive director of The Glebe, a LifeSpire continuing care retirement community in Daleville.

Most recently, D’Ardenne served as administrator of health services at The Glebe. She joined The Glebe in 2005 as the director of dining services. After 25 years of food service management in the hotel, restaurant, and senior living industries, D’Ardenne was looking for a new challenge. In May 2006, she began a health care administration degree program, which led her to become a licensed nursing home administrator in June 2010. With experience in assisted living administration and skilled nursing management, she further expanded her role in April 2011 by assuming leadership of The Glebe’s health and wellness programs.

“We are pleased to promote Ms. D’Ardenne to lead The Glebe,” said Jonathan Cook, LifeSpire president and CEO. “She has been a part of The Glebe from its beginnings and has played a major role in The Glebe’s success. We have every confidence she will lead The Glebe with excellence and a focus on resident-centered care.”

D’Ardenne and her husband, Dwayne, have three children. She enjoys cooking, kayaking, cycling, and running.

In a related move, The Glebe’s director of nursing, Brandon Evans, has been promoted to administrator of health services, the position vacated by D’Ardenne’s promotion. Evans joined The Glebe in 2011. He is a registered nurse who began his health services career as a nursing assistant, progressed to a licensed practical nurse and then obtained his registered nurse license. Evans’ nursing background includes supervisory responsibilities over a large skilled nursing program with more than 180-skilled beds, infection control, quality improvement and staff development.

Brandon received his associate’s degree in science, registered nursing, cum laude from Virginia Western Community College, and he is a member of Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society. He received a bachelor of science in nursing from the Jefferson College of Health Science. He and his wife, Amy, have two children. He enjoys hunting and fishing.

 

Ann Lovell is Corporate Director of Communications for LifeSpire of Virginia, formerly Virginia Baptist Homes. For more information, email alovell@lifespireliving.org or call (804) 521-9192.

LifeSpire of Virginia operates four continuing care retirement communities in Virginia: The Chesapeake in Newport News, The Culpeper in Culpeper, The Glebe in Daleville and Lakewood in Richmond.

 


10 Questions to ask a CCRC

09/01/17

If you or a loved one is considering a continuing care retirement community, here are ten of the most important questions you should ask:

10. What is the ratio of independent living residences to assisted living and healthcare residences?

Some CCRCs are mainly independent living communities with a proportionately small number of assisted living or skilled care units available. This is particularly concerning for newer communities, where very few residents require care now but may in the future. The question is whether there will be enough availability in the healthcare center for residents requiring care at that time. On the flip side, some CCRCs evolved out of established nursing care facilities that added a few independent living residences. In this case, you may find proportionately more residents requiring care services than living independently. On average independent living residences represent 60-75 percent of the total residential units.

9. How have your monthly rates changed over the last five years?

This is important to ask for two reasons. First, it gives you an indication of what to expect going forward so you can plan accordingly. Second, it could also be an indication of the community’s financial viability. Average fee increases of 3-4 percent per year are not uncommon in the industry. If you find there have been years when the increase has been substantially more, you should find out why. Be sure you ask what the increases have been each year over the past 3-5 years, as opposed to an average. Averages can sometimes hide larger increases in a given year.

8. What services are included in my monthly fee, and what will cost extra?

When a provider shares with you their monthly rates, be sure to find out what types of services are included, and which are extra. In some cases, you could ultimately spend considerably more than the published rate each month. This is particularly important if you are comparing two communities and one operates à la carte, while the other operates under an all-inclusive model. One example of this would be the number of meals per day included in the monthly rate.

7. What is the level of experience of your management team and board of directors?

An experienced management team is vitally important to maintaining high operating standards and diligent financial management. Ask whether the management team has a track record of managing other CCRCs. Also look for a board of directors that is culturally and professionally diverse. The board should have directors with strong backgrounds in healthcare, hospitality, finance, and real estate. You can learn more about LifeSpire’s management team here.

6. What happens if I run out of money and can’t pay fees?

Most CCRCs, particularly not-for-profit providers and even some for-profits, will do everything possible to help residents stay put and receive services if the resident runs out of money due to no fault of their own. In fact, many providers maintain a financial assistance or endowment fund to help with this effort. Yet, there are some CCRCs that will ask you to vacate your residence if you are no longer able to pay. LifeSpire’s VBH Foundation raises funds to help LifeSpire’s life care residents who outlive their financial resources remain in their homes. In 2016, the VBH Foundation provided more than $1.1 million in benevolence to 59 residents across all four LifeSpire communities.

5. How will my monthly rate be impacted if I require assisted living or skilled nursing care?

There are several different types of residency contracts offered by CCRCs. The key with each one is to understand what happens to your monthly fees if you ultimately require assisted living services or skilled nursing care. All other things being equal, there is generally a trade-off between the amount of the entry fee and monthly fees, and the amount you will ultimately pay if you require care services.

4. Does your published rate for healthcare services include a semi-private or private room?

The published rates for a room in the healthcare center may reflect only semi-private rooms. You may be required to pay the difference in cost for a private room. Some providers only offer private rooms.

3. What are the stipulations for receiving a refund (if the community offers refundable entry fees)?

If you are considering a CCRC that offers partially or fully refundable entry fees, ask if your home or apartment within the community has to be resold before the refund will be paid. Is there a maximum time limit whereby the refund will be paid regardless of whether the residential unit has been resold or not? Also, are you or your heirs required to continue paying the monthly fees during that time period?

2. What information can you provide to help assure me that the level of care provided in your healthcare center is of the highest quality?

Although it could be years before you require assisted living or healthcare services, you want to know that when that day comes, you will receive the best care possible. Ask to take a tour of the healthcare center, and closely observe the facilities and the care team. Does the staff seem happy and attentive to residents? Is the facility clean and without odor? Ask about staff turnover ratios. The industry average for skilled nursing centers is around 40 percent. A low turnover rate generally indicates a happy staff, which translates into better care for residents. If the healthcare center is Medicare certified you can also visit Medicare.gov to find information on complaints, deficiencies, staffing, and more. All of LifeSpire’s communities have received either a 4- or 5-star CMS rating.

1. What information can you provide to help assure me that your community is financially positioned to meet its long-term commitment to residents?

In order to fulfill its long-term obligation to residents, a CCRC must maintain a strong financial standing. A financial professional who is well-versed in the financial operations of CCRCs can help you analyze key financial ratios, such as operating margins and debt service coverage, but a few things to look for initially are a willingness by representatives of the community to share their audited financial statements, positive net worth, strong demand (usually indicated by occupancy ratios above 90 percent), well-kept facilities, and an experienced management team. Also consider whether the community is located in a state that regulates CCRCs. If so, the state may have minimum financial requirements that must be met on a year-to-year basis. Read more about LifeSpire’s current financial standing.

Retirement counselors at The Glebe are available to answer all these questions and any others you may have. Contact them today at 540-591-2100.

 

 

 

Content provided by MyLifeSite.com


Meals made-to-order, with wellness always on the menu

Earlier this year, The Glebe introduced exciting improvements to our already stellar dining program that promised to enhance both the experience of dining at the community and the nutritional benefits of our menu as well. Now, residents enjoy more options of what they eat, and more importantly, how, when and where they eat it.

“The freedom to choose healthy, freshly made items elevates the entire dining experience for our residents,” says Joyce Horton, Director of Dining Services at The Glebe. “In our dining room, meals can now be made to your own preference. We’ve brought a restaurant-style experience to The Glebe. And since everything is now cook-to-order, we’re serving fresher food that doesn’t spend hours sitting under a warmer.”

The new menu also includes heart-healthy and sugar-free items. While these fresh selections offer more choice to our residents when they sit down inside our restaurant-quality dining room, those who prefer a more flexible meal schedule have reason to celebrate, too.

“Residents love the new express dining option as well,” Horton says. “It’s great for those in a hurry who don’t want to make dinner such an event. Every day offers a new entree, salad, bread and a dessert, which is now made in-house with fresh ingredients. The residents love the flexibility of this option.”

If these first few months of the new dining program are any indication, the improvements made have been a complete success.

“We all love it, especially the residents” Horton continues. “Attendance in the dining room has improved, and our take-out and delivery orders have gone up too. This was a big change for us, but we strive daily to give them a quality dining experience. Anything we can do to improve the lives of our residents, we’re happy to do.


This fall, get away for a few days at The Glebe

When the leaves change and the weather cools, that’s when the Blue Ridge Mountains really come alive. There’s no better time of year to enjoy this picturesque setting, to wander its hills and trails, and to simply relax while breathing in crisp mountain air. Which is why there’s also no better time to get away for a while and experience this incredible location from The Glebe.

The Glebe Getaway is your invitation to enjoy a fun-filled and relaxing visit as our very special guests at The Glebe. Experience firsthand the kind of retirement lifestyle you could call your own if you choose to call our community home. Join us for a three-day getaway, or customize a unique stay that works best with your schedule. Upon your arrival, we’ll provide you with detailed information about the area’s most popular activities and favorite sightseeing destinations, including any special events that may be on the calendar right here at The Glebe.

The Glebe Getaway includes:

  • Accommodations in our guest home or apartment
  • Full access to all of our on-campus amenities
  • Complimentary breakfasts, lunches and dinners throughout your stay
  • Convenient concierge services
  • A welcome basket filled with delicious snacks and delightful refreshments to greet you upon arrival
  • Maps and an itinerary personalized especially for you

In addition to all this, you’ll also have an opportunity to sit down with one of our retirement counselors to learn more about retirement living and Life Care at The Glebe. Don’t miss out on your chance to take advantage of this incredible opportunity, and, more importantly, to get away for a stay in the mountains!

Call 866-376-8990 to schedule your Glebe Getaway today!


Tips for Retirement Downsizing

8/21/17

One of the main reasons older adults put off downsizing or moving to a retirement community is the need to deal with all the “stuff” they’ve accumulated over the years. Yet, if done right, the process of downsizing may not be as daunting as you think. It may even be enjoyable — even refreshing. A lot of the physical work can be done by others, so your main role is to categorizeorganize, and direct. Here are six tips to get you started:

Start now

If you are thinking about moving, whether to a retirement community or to a smaller home, now is a good time to start the downsizing process. Don’t wait until you are ready to move. At that point, the process and emotions may be overwhelming, and you will have other things that require your attention. Even if you ultimately choose not to move, your family members will thank you! There will be less stuff for them to deal with one day.

Recognize you can’t keep it all

To know what items you can and should purge, you first need to know which items you absolutely cannot part with. But here’s the key: After you have created the initial list, pare it down even further. This can be a tough exercise, but the reality is that some of the things you think you need to save may not be necessary to keep after all. For example, that sport coat in the closet you’ve held onto for 15 years because you are sure you will wear it again? It’s probably time to part ways. That stack of magazines with holiday recipes dating back 10 years? Those can go, too. Your most cherished recipes will not be hidden in a tall stack of magazines anyway, right?

Prepare yourself: Your kids may not want your stuff

Another popular reason for hanging on to various items is that kids or grandkids will want them. But many people eventually discover that the things they thought would be coveted by their adult children were not so desirable after all. To help sort this out, consider inviting your children over for a day to go through your things and find out what they actually want.

Sort by large and small

Once you know what you want to keep, make a list of big and small items. The big items are anything that will not fit in a regular size moving box, such as a sofa or table. As you consider these items, be sure to think about the dimensions and style of your new home so you will know if they will fit. Many CCRCs have move-in coordinators who can help you with this.

Obviously, it could be tough to list out every single smaller item, but you want to think about your most utilized items first. Consider things like silverware, pictures, kitchenware, books, etc.

Sell, donate, or discard?

Once you’ve decided what items are no longer needed, it is time to decide what to do with them. Create a separate list with three columns: Sell, Donate, and Trash. As you consider what you want to sell, remember that items rarely bring in the amount of cash the owner thinks they will. In some cases it may simply be easier to donate or discard an item than to go to the trouble of trying to sell it.

However, if you feel sure it would be worth the time to try to sell some of your belongings, then you have a number of options. You could try to sell them online with sites like Ebay or Craig’s List. (Please take caution if you use Craigslist or a similar website. If possible, meet the buyer in a public place and take someone with you.) Sometimes a good old-fashioned yard sale could do the job, but you will want to get someone to help you with the set up and break down. Alternately, if you have more than a few valuable items, any number of local companies will be willing to administer an estate sale for you.

Hauling the junk

Finally, after you have gone through the above-mentioned steps, you may be surprised by the amount of left over junk. This would include things that have piled up in a garage or crawlspace over the years, such as old paint cans. Many national companies will come by and haul these things away for you. All you have to do is point to the items you want removed, and they will recycle or trash the items accordingly.

If you are considering moving to The Glebe, our move-in coordinator is happy to help you think through what you might or might not need in your new home. Give our marketing department a call at 540-591-2100 and set up an appointment today!

 

 

Content provided by MyLifeSite.com


NOW HIRING: Executive Director of The Glebe

08/17/18


RICHMOND, Virginia—LifeSpire of Virginia is seeking to hire an executive director for The Glebe, a not-for-profit life plan community in Daleville, Virginia. The Glebe is one of four communities owned and operated by LifeSpire of Virginia, based in Richmond, Virginia.

The Glebe currently consists of 154 independent living apartments/cottages, 32 assisted living beds, and 32 skilled nursing beds.  Master Planning is underway to consider growth opportunities for additional independent living apartments and/or a memory care neighborhood.

The community has an outstanding reputation in the Roanoke market and currently provides service to 256 residents and currently employs 192 staff members. The health center provides excellent care and has a 5-star rating with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Reporting to the Chief Operating Officer, the Executive Director is responsible for continuing and enhancing the reputation of the community by providing strategic leadership consistent with the LifeSpire mission, vision, and values. The Executive Director shall provide leadership in the development of policies, procedures and plans which result in the accomplishment of both the organization’s long- and short-range goals. The Executive Director is responsible for ensuring the development and delivery of appropriate services to residents, clients, and their families.

Key qualifications, duties, and personal characteristics for this position are:

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Minimum 5 years’ experience as an Executive Director of a life plan community
  • Bachelor’s degree in a relevant field
  • NHA license is a plus, but not required
  • Thorough understanding of the senior housing industry
  • Financial management skills; ability to develop and manage the budget for the entire community; identify areas for expense savings or revenue generating opportunities
  • Ability to maintain and strengthen positive working relationships with staff, residents, and leadership across communities
  • With support of the leadership team, develop and implement a strategic plan that aligns with the LifeSpire mission, vision, and values
  • Provide quality programming and services that meet the needs of today’s and tomorrow’s consumer
  • Develop and sustain a community culture of teamwork, professionalism, mutual respect, continuous quality improvement, and accountability
  • Develop a strong team of competent and committed professionals who are committed to service excellence
  • Articulate a vision, create consensus, and motivate people to build a sense of community

KEY DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Support the strategic plan and direction of LifeSpire of Virginia.
  • Direct the overall operations of the facility while complying with state and federal regulations as well as the company’s policies and procedures
  • Ensure compliance and licensure with all licensing agencies
  • Manage occupancy development.
  • Plan, develop, and manage facility’s operating and capital budgets
  • Develop and monitor all contracted provider services.
  • Foster effective communications and teamwork among the facility’s management group
  • Maintain current knowledge about changes in federal, state, and local regulations
  • Focus on achieving and maintaining 5-star status in the community

PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS:

The ideal candidate will be a competent, compassionate, and committed professional who is willing to enter into a long-term commitment of service to the organization and do so within a team-oriented, collaborative, servant-leadership environment.  He/she will be a person of high integrity and ethical standards and have a personal reputation that will reflect well on the organization.  Of equal importance will be a high standard of care and concern for current and future residents.  He/she will evidence a commitment to establishing community collaborations. As a relationship-oriented person, the Executive Director will be an excellent communicator and will maintain a visible presence among staff, residents, clients, and within the surrounding community.

This job offers a competitive base salary with a bonus incentive structure, as well as an excellent benefits package. The full-time benefits package includes options for health, dental, and life insurance, retirement plan, generous paid time off, and relocation assistance.  EOE.

Qualified applicants may apply by e-mailing a resume to:

jobs@lifespireliving.org